Mas Candi - 'El Vesper de la Gloriosa' Cava Methode Ancestrale NV

$32.00
Sale price

Regular price $32.00

"This is NOT a Cava!  This is a Sparkling wine produced using the “Ancestral Method”. Pale yellow colour with soft green iridescence, constant bubbles and a fine steady flow. On the nose there are aromas of white fruit (pear), hints of citrus (lemon) which provides a very refreshing background. Some creamy notes of pastries, brioche, soft nuts (almonds), presence of yeast with hints of warm bread and croissant, a touch of herbs. Pleasant coolness during its entry, tasty overall presence with fresh and ripe white fruit, light touch of a bitter taste, dried fruit notes, good acidity, spacious, light creaminess. Refreshing sparkly. Long and an aftertaste of white fruit and some citrus."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mas Candi

Mas Candi is a revolutionary winery located in the Penedes region of north-eastern Spain. It was started up in just 2006 by four viticulture and winemaking students from France. They are a tiny winemaking venture that use solely their own grapes from their own organically farmed vineyards. Their flagship grape is Xarel-lo, one of the most under-rated white grapes in all of Spain. They have made it their life's work over the last decade to produce serious wines from Xarel-lo to show the world how incredible it can be.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Mèthod Ancestral (Sparkling wine from Penedès)

While this wine originates from the most famous Cava-making region in Spain, it is made in the mèthod ancestral.

 

HISTORY OF THE NAME

"The Penedès became, during the Spanish Civil War, the centre of operations of Republican Aviation, Gloriosa, They created four airfields in this territory when their airfield in Aragon was lost and the advance of Franco 's troops was expected in the province of Lleida. Also the Penedès became, from that moment, and one of the main focus of the bombing targets on the other side.

These four airfields, located in Santa Oliva, the Monjos, Sabanell (Font-Ruby) and the Pacs would become to be known as the Vesper of the Gloriosa, in Castilian the Avispero of Gloriosa. They were crucial for the actions of the Ebro and Segre that took on place between April and May 1938, during the Battle of Ebro and during the offensive campaign Seròs and Catalonia, until January 1939 when they were abandoned by the Republicans against Franco's offensive.

The Regional Council of Alt Penendès, with the collaboration of the Institute of Penedesencs Studies, Vinseum and the General Department of Memory and Peace of the Generalitat sign-posted the route dedicated to Republican Aviation in the Penedès and runs through the remains of the four aerodromes: shelters, barracks, control booths...

  

 

--------THE REGION--------

Penedes

Penedes is the vast region in northeastern Spain. The fair majority of the Pendes' claim to fame it from the "Champagne of Spain": Cava. Cava is a sparkling wine that is made in exactly the same way as Champagne (bottle-fermented/methode traditionelle) just with Spanish grape varietals. Those white grape varietals are: Xarel-lo, Parellada and Viura and Tempranillo and Garnacha can be used for the roses. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"This is NOT a Cava!  This is a Sparkling wine produced using the “Ancestral Method”. Pale yellow colour with soft green iridescence, constant bubbles and a fine steady flow. On the nose there are aromas of white fruit (pear), hints of citrus (lemon) which provides a very refreshing background. Some creamy notes of pastries, brioche, soft nuts (almonds), presence of yeast with hints of warm bread and croissant, a touch of herbs. Pleasant coolness during its entry, tasty overall presence with fresh and ripe white fruit, light touch of a bitter taste, dried fruit notes, good acidity, spacious, light creaminess. Refreshing sparkly. Long and an aftertaste of white fruit and some citrus."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mas Candi

Mas Candi is a revolutionary winery located in the Penedes region of north-eastern Spain. It was started up in just 2006 by four viticulture and winemaking students from France. They are a tiny winemaking venture that use solely their own grapes from their own organically farmed vineyards. Their flagship grape is Xarel-lo, one of the most under-rated white grapes in all of Spain. They have made it their life's work over the last decade to produce serious wines from Xarel-lo to show the world how incredible it can be.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Mèthod Ancestral (Sparkling wine from Penedès)

While this wine originates from the most famous Cava-making region in Spain, it is made in the mèthod ancestral.

 

HISTORY OF THE NAME

"The Penedès became, during the Spanish Civil War, the centre of operations of Republican Aviation, Gloriosa, They created four airfields in this territory when their airfield in Aragon was lost and the advance of Franco 's troops was expected in the province of Lleida. Also the Penedès became, from that moment, and one of the main focus of the bombing targets on the other side.

These four airfields, located in Santa Oliva, the Monjos, Sabanell (Font-Ruby) and the Pacs would become to be known as the Vesper of the Gloriosa, in Castilian the Avispero of Gloriosa. They were crucial for the actions of the Ebro and Segre that took on place between April and May 1938, during the Battle of Ebro and during the offensive campaign Seròs and Catalonia, until January 1939 when they were abandoned by the Republicans against Franco's offensive.

The Regional Council of Alt Penendès, with the collaboration of the Institute of Penedesencs Studies, Vinseum and the General Department of Memory and Peace of the Generalitat sign-posted the route dedicated to Republican Aviation in the Penedès and runs through the remains of the four aerodromes: shelters, barracks, control booths...

  

 

--------THE REGION--------

Penedes

Penedes is the vast region in northeastern Spain. The fair majority of the Pendes' claim to fame it from the "Champagne of Spain": Cava. Cava is a sparkling wine that is made in exactly the same way as Champagne (bottle-fermented/methode traditionelle) just with Spanish grape varietals. Those white grape varietals are: Xarel-lo, Parellada and Viura and Tempranillo and Garnacha can be used for the roses. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.