Layer 1 SOLD-OUT

Libiamo - Gewurztraminer 2017

$40.00
Sale price

Regular price $40.00

"One of the first orange wines that I have ever taken seriously and enjoyed. Loaded with layers and layers of flavour. Quince, apricots, dried ginger, orange zest and lemon souffle. The more it opens it the more interesting it becomes with waves of floral flavours arising from the glass. A very interesting and exciting wine."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Libiamo

Libiamo represents the next generation for the Millton family, in particular their children Sam and Monique, and how we as this generation now look for something that is completely un-manipulated and doesn’t leave a debt or burden on the planet. The Milltons are endlessly committed to improvement, always looking for ways to push themselves and others and without question should be credited as being one of the most important catalysts for change in the New Zealand wine industry.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Gewurztraminer

Gewürztraminer is one of the most aromatic grape varietals known to man. It has a hauntingly beautiful aroma of rose, lychee and baking spices. Without a doubt it is most well known for being one of the noble grapes of Alsace in northern France where it makes dry to sweet white wines. After France, you can find dry or off-dry versions of it all around the world but most especially in Germany, New Zealand and the USA.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Gisborne

Gisborne is one of the smallest wine regions in New Zealand. At one point it was synonymous with Chardonnay and Muller-Thurgau but things have since changed and it is now a hub of aromatic white wines and small producers. The shining light amongst the region is Millton Vineyards. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"One of the first orange wines that I have ever taken seriously and enjoyed. Loaded with layers and layers of flavour. Quince, apricots, dried ginger, orange zest and lemon souffle. The more it opens it the more interesting it becomes with waves of floral flavours arising from the glass. A very interesting and exciting wine."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Libiamo

Libiamo represents the next generation for the Millton family, in particular their children Sam and Monique, and how we as this generation now look for something that is completely un-manipulated and doesn’t leave a debt or burden on the planet. The Milltons are endlessly committed to improvement, always looking for ways to push themselves and others and without question should be credited as being one of the most important catalysts for change in the New Zealand wine industry.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Gewurztraminer

Gewürztraminer is one of the most aromatic grape varietals known to man. It has a hauntingly beautiful aroma of rose, lychee and baking spices. Without a doubt it is most well known for being one of the noble grapes of Alsace in northern France where it makes dry to sweet white wines. After France, you can find dry or off-dry versions of it all around the world but most especially in Germany, New Zealand and the USA.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Gisborne

Gisborne is one of the smallest wine regions in New Zealand. At one point it was synonymous with Chardonnay and Muller-Thurgau but things have since changed and it is now a hub of aromatic white wines and small producers. The shining light amongst the region is Millton Vineyards. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.