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Kurayoshi 18YO Malt Whisky 700ml

$260.00
Sale price

Regular price $260.00

"Appearance: Almost indistinguishable from the 12-year-old

Nose: Almond Joy candy bars immediately leap to mind: almond, milk chocolate, and tons of creamy coconut. There’s fruit too, like raspberry, fig, ripe plum, and white grape. As the nose opens, Bit O’ Honey candy, light caramel, white chocolate, and some slightly bitter green herbs. Very inviting.

Palate: A sweet note kicks things off before pivoting towards a mysteriously high-toned spice. (Allspice? White pepper?) Fruit-wise, there’s melon and lime, but the grain is much more integrated and harmonious than the younger offerings. A very long finish has caramel and chocolate notes, plus lingering flavours of melon and papaya at the bitter end. Nicely matured.

Final Thoughts & Score: This is extremely delicious, although lighter in body and palate than many seasoned single malt drinkers might expect from an 18-year-old. It’s very pretty, though, with an appreciable elegance."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Matsui

Based at the foothills of Mt. Daisen, Kurayoshi whisky is produced at the Matsui Shuzou facility in the Tottori Prefecture, northwest of Kyoto, which was founded in 1910. Over 14% of the area is a natural park, and Kurayoshi takes pride in their use of the mountain’s crystal clear water, filtered through volcanic stone in the making of their whiskies, sake and shochu.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Appearance: Almost indistinguishable from the 12-year-old

Nose: Almond Joy candy bars immediately leap to mind: almond, milk chocolate, and tons of creamy coconut. There’s fruit too, like raspberry, fig, ripe plum, and white grape. As the nose opens, Bit O’ Honey candy, light caramel, white chocolate, and some slightly bitter green herbs. Very inviting.

Palate: A sweet note kicks things off before pivoting towards a mysteriously high-toned spice. (Allspice? White pepper?) Fruit-wise, there’s melon and lime, but the grain is much more integrated and harmonious than the younger offerings. A very long finish has caramel and chocolate notes, plus lingering flavours of melon and papaya at the bitter end. Nicely matured.

Final Thoughts & Score: This is extremely delicious, although lighter in body and palate than many seasoned single malt drinkers might expect from an 18-year-old. It’s very pretty, though, with an appreciable elegance."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Matsui

Based at the foothills of Mt. Daisen, Kurayoshi whisky is produced at the Matsui Shuzou facility in the Tottori Prefecture, northwest of Kyoto, which was founded in 1910. Over 14% of the area is a natural park, and Kurayoshi takes pride in their use of the mountain’s crystal clear water, filtered through volcanic stone in the making of their whiskies, sake and shochu.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.