Giles Robin - Crozes Hermitage Papillon 2017

$45.00
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Regular price $45.00

"Aromas of dark roasted herbs with a peppery edge. A strong palate with really impressive dark plums, blackberries and dark chocolate. Rich and plush tannins, too. This is excellent!"

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Giles Robin

A good friend and from the same generation as Jean-Louis Chave – Gilles Robin is a 10 years old star. Gilles now owns 15 hectares of vineyard, mostly in Crozes-Hermitage where his vines are close to Chapoutier's Meysonniers, and Jaboulet's Thalabert.

Gilles Robin took over the running of this vineyard in 1996, with the freedom to produce his own wines. With a history of winegrowing spanning four generations, Gilles' aim was to realise the potential of the 35 year old vines.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah

Both Syrah or Shiraz is the name given to this grape varietal depending on where you are in the world. In France, particularly in the Rhone Valley, it goes by the name of Syrah and it makes the floral reds of Hermitage, Cornas, St Joseph and Cote Rôtie. Whereas in Australia, particularly in the Barossa Valley, it is Shiraz and it produces bolder, spicier and oaky red wines. It is planted across the world in the warmest of regions and it is usually dependant on how the winemaker produces as to what it's name will be either in the prettier female style or the bulkier masculine style.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Northern Rhone Valley

The Northern Rhone Valley is where you will find some of the most well-known names in France's legacy. Syrah is the king and shines in the top sub-regions of Cote-Rotie, Hermitage, and Cornas. Viognier is the white grape of Condrieu otherwise Marsanne or Roussanne are the white sisters to know from the other sub-regions. Plenty of goodness to go around!

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Aromas of dark roasted herbs with a peppery edge. A strong palate with really impressive dark plums, blackberries and dark chocolate. Rich and plush tannins, too. This is excellent!"

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Giles Robin

A good friend and from the same generation as Jean-Louis Chave – Gilles Robin is a 10 years old star. Gilles now owns 15 hectares of vineyard, mostly in Crozes-Hermitage where his vines are close to Chapoutier's Meysonniers, and Jaboulet's Thalabert.

Gilles Robin took over the running of this vineyard in 1996, with the freedom to produce his own wines. With a history of winegrowing spanning four generations, Gilles' aim was to realise the potential of the 35 year old vines.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah

Both Syrah or Shiraz is the name given to this grape varietal depending on where you are in the world. In France, particularly in the Rhone Valley, it goes by the name of Syrah and it makes the floral reds of Hermitage, Cornas, St Joseph and Cote Rôtie. Whereas in Australia, particularly in the Barossa Valley, it is Shiraz and it produces bolder, spicier and oaky red wines. It is planted across the world in the warmest of regions and it is usually dependant on how the winemaker produces as to what it's name will be either in the prettier female style or the bulkier masculine style.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Northern Rhone Valley

The Northern Rhone Valley is where you will find some of the most well-known names in France's legacy. Syrah is the king and shines in the top sub-regions of Cote-Rotie, Hermitage, and Cornas. Viognier is the white grape of Condrieu otherwise Marsanne or Roussanne are the white sisters to know from the other sub-regions. Plenty of goodness to go around!

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.