Tony Bish - 'Skin in the Game' Chardonnay 2019

$35.00
Sale price

Regular price $35.00

"This shows great Chardonnay fruit and there is the added element of the skin component giving some palate grip and an exoctic Marsanne/Rousanne pithy, orange peel, spice character. This wine succeeds in having the best of the skin contact element and purity of Chardonnay. An exciting wine.  

This is Tony’s version of a skin-fermented wine – aka Orange wine, although a very clean one. Grapes de-stemmed, fermented for a short time on skins then pressed into a concrete egg for a further 11 months. 


Winery notes
"Following our theme of innovation, we have a spectacular ‘whole berry ferment’ wine to share with you. I have tried many ‘Orange’ wines that have been fermented on skins and left for long periods to age on skins, and to be honest, I usually find them excessively phenolic, bitter and often oxidative. So I have tried a very different approach!

Handpicked Chardonnay was gentle de-stemmed through a specialist Socma destemmer, resulting in whole berries and no stems. We then foot crushed the berries before fermenting in an open top fermenter in a chilled barrel room. As soon as the ferment was dry, we transferred the young wine to a concrete egg for 11 months maturation. The result is spectacular!!

Medium straw appearance. The aroma is lifted and exotically complex, with orange blossom, tangerine peel and grapefruit citrus notes mingling with riper tropical notes of mango and honeydew melon. There are nutty nougat nuances along with a touch of white pepper spice. The palate is full bodied and layered, with orange and apple notes mingling with hazelnut and almond. There is freshness and minerality here, with an oyster shell saltiness giving freshness and zing. The tannins are clothed in a richly textural coat. Tremendous presence and length on the palate. Truly unique and full of expression!"

"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tony Bish

With over three decades of winemaking behind him, Tony Bish is one of New Zealand’s most highly respected winemakers.Tony is synonymous with Sacred Hill and Chardonnay, and the ‘Riflemans’ Chardonnay is seen as his signature wine. As is the trend nowadays, winemakers are taking the opportunity to do something of their own and a little differently from, and in addition to their ‘full-time’ job, and so it is with Tony Bish and the launch of his own label.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the most known and most widely planted white grape variety around the world. It is historically home in Burgundy where it produces a more refined, mineral and poised wines all up and down the Cote de Beaune and in Chablis. Throughout the new world it gained fame in both California and Australia where it is known to produce big, rich, buttery and tropical fruit-laden white wines.

--------THE REGION--------

Hawkes Bay

Sunny Hawkes Bay is along the eastern coast of New Zealand's north island. It is here where some of the most fruit-forward wines come from. They are known for their tropical Chardonnays and their juicy reds from the excellent Bordeaux wines to the peppery Syrahs. 

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"This shows great Chardonnay fruit and there is the added element of the skin component giving some palate grip and an exoctic Marsanne/Rousanne pithy, orange peel, spice character. This wine succeeds in having the best of the skin contact element and purity of Chardonnay. An exciting wine.  

This is Tony’s version of a skin-fermented wine – aka Orange wine, although a very clean one. Grapes de-stemmed, fermented for a short time on skins then pressed into a concrete egg for a further 11 months. 


Winery notes
"Following our theme of innovation, we have a spectacular ‘whole berry ferment’ wine to share with you. I have tried many ‘Orange’ wines that have been fermented on skins and left for long periods to age on skins, and to be honest, I usually find them excessively phenolic, bitter and often oxidative. So I have tried a very different approach!

Handpicked Chardonnay was gentle de-stemmed through a specialist Socma destemmer, resulting in whole berries and no stems. We then foot crushed the berries before fermenting in an open top fermenter in a chilled barrel room. As soon as the ferment was dry, we transferred the young wine to a concrete egg for 11 months maturation. The result is spectacular!!

Medium straw appearance. The aroma is lifted and exotically complex, with orange blossom, tangerine peel and grapefruit citrus notes mingling with riper tropical notes of mango and honeydew melon. There are nutty nougat nuances along with a touch of white pepper spice. The palate is full bodied and layered, with orange and apple notes mingling with hazelnut and almond. There is freshness and minerality here, with an oyster shell saltiness giving freshness and zing. The tannins are clothed in a richly textural coat. Tremendous presence and length on the palate. Truly unique and full of expression!"

"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tony Bish

With over three decades of winemaking behind him, Tony Bish is one of New Zealand’s most highly respected winemakers.Tony is synonymous with Sacred Hill and Chardonnay, and the ‘Riflemans’ Chardonnay is seen as his signature wine. As is the trend nowadays, winemakers are taking the opportunity to do something of their own and a little differently from, and in addition to their ‘full-time’ job, and so it is with Tony Bish and the launch of his own label.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the most known and most widely planted white grape variety around the world. It is historically home in Burgundy where it produces a more refined, mineral and poised wines all up and down the Cote de Beaune and in Chablis. Throughout the new world it gained fame in both California and Australia where it is known to produce big, rich, buttery and tropical fruit-laden white wines.

--------THE REGION--------

Hawkes Bay

Sunny Hawkes Bay is along the eastern coast of New Zealand's north island. It is here where some of the most fruit-forward wines come from. They are known for their tropical Chardonnays and their juicy reds from the excellent Bordeaux wines to the peppery Syrahs. 

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.