Timo Mayer Cabernet Sauvignon 2019

$105.00
Sale price

Regular price $105.00

TASTING NOTES: Fresh and funky, with aromas flint and gun smoke giving way to citrus and tropical fruits. A full, textural palate is well balanced by vibrant acidity. Excellent persistence. 

VINEYARD: Fruit is sourced from 20-year-old vines grown on the Bloody Hill vineyard, a 6- acre plot on red rocky, volcanic soils. 'It's called that "cause it's bloody steep!' says Timo. Altitude varies between 300 and 470 metres. The climate is relatively cool for Australia with some maritime influence, with rainfall in winter and spring, relatively cool, dry summers.

VITICULTURE: The vineyards are farmed organically.


WINEMAKING: Fruit is handpicked and pressed in whole bunches. Juice is transferred to old hogsheads to undergo wild fermentation as well as full malolactic fermentation. In spring the wine is racked into stainless steel to settle for 4 months before being bottled without fining of filtration. 
This wine is suitable for vegans and vegetarians.
 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Timo Mayer

German-born, enigmatic winemaker Timo Mayer is one of the great characters of the Yarra Valley. The words bombastic, charismatic and wild are as much applicable to the man as his wines.

From his close-planted Yarra Valley vineyard, evocatively named 'Bloody Hill', Timo carves out some astounding wines made with low levels of new oak and minimal additions.

The signature of Timo's winemaking style is his penchant for whole-bunch ferment. His wines have an ethereal quality, firm tannins and impeccable structure.

These are compelling and extremely limited wines that tell a unique story of the Yarra Valley.

--------THE REGION--------

Yarra Valley, Australia

The world’s great wines evoke a sense of place and tell a story of the land, the season and the grape. The Yarra River has meandered its way through the hills of the wine region for many thousands of years and the unique landscape and terrain have created a vast array of growing sites for outstanding cool climate wines.

The wine region situated just 45 kilometres east of Melbourne’s CBD, the Yarra Valley is a large and diverse region. So diverse, it is hard to make any conclusive observations when you consider the range of influences which include both Mediterranean and continental climates, elevation from 50m – 1250m including the influence of the Great Dividing Range, and a number of soil types. All these influences in addition to the standard factors such as varying rainfall, temperatures, wind etc contribute to a dynamic and varied region that continues to challenge and excite. It is the geology of the Yarra Valley that primarily drives and dictates varietal plantings and their resulting expressions.

To pigeon hole the Yarra into one box is to omit what ultimately makes the Yarra so exciting.

Victoria’s Yarra Valley wine region is a legally defined Geographical Indication (GI). A GI is an official description of an Australian wine region, designed to protect the use of the regional name under international law.

Wine labelled “Yarra Valley” must consist of at least 85% Yarra Valley fruit.  This upholds label integrity and safeguards the consumer.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

TASTING NOTES: Fresh and funky, with aromas flint and gun smoke giving way to citrus and tropical fruits. A full, textural palate is well balanced by vibrant acidity. Excellent persistence. 

VINEYARD: Fruit is sourced from 20-year-old vines grown on the Bloody Hill vineyard, a 6- acre plot on red rocky, volcanic soils. 'It's called that "cause it's bloody steep!' says Timo. Altitude varies between 300 and 470 metres. The climate is relatively cool for Australia with some maritime influence, with rainfall in winter and spring, relatively cool, dry summers.

VITICULTURE: The vineyards are farmed organically.


WINEMAKING: Fruit is handpicked and pressed in whole bunches. Juice is transferred to old hogsheads to undergo wild fermentation as well as full malolactic fermentation. In spring the wine is racked into stainless steel to settle for 4 months before being bottled without fining of filtration. 
This wine is suitable for vegans and vegetarians.
 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Timo Mayer

German-born, enigmatic winemaker Timo Mayer is one of the great characters of the Yarra Valley. The words bombastic, charismatic and wild are as much applicable to the man as his wines.

From his close-planted Yarra Valley vineyard, evocatively named 'Bloody Hill', Timo carves out some astounding wines made with low levels of new oak and minimal additions.

The signature of Timo's winemaking style is his penchant for whole-bunch ferment. His wines have an ethereal quality, firm tannins and impeccable structure.

These are compelling and extremely limited wines that tell a unique story of the Yarra Valley.

--------THE REGION--------

Yarra Valley, Australia

The world’s great wines evoke a sense of place and tell a story of the land, the season and the grape. The Yarra River has meandered its way through the hills of the wine region for many thousands of years and the unique landscape and terrain have created a vast array of growing sites for outstanding cool climate wines.

The wine region situated just 45 kilometres east of Melbourne’s CBD, the Yarra Valley is a large and diverse region. So diverse, it is hard to make any conclusive observations when you consider the range of influences which include both Mediterranean and continental climates, elevation from 50m – 1250m including the influence of the Great Dividing Range, and a number of soil types. All these influences in addition to the standard factors such as varying rainfall, temperatures, wind etc contribute to a dynamic and varied region that continues to challenge and excite. It is the geology of the Yarra Valley that primarily drives and dictates varietal plantings and their resulting expressions.

To pigeon hole the Yarra into one box is to omit what ultimately makes the Yarra so exciting.

Victoria’s Yarra Valley wine region is a legally defined Geographical Indication (GI). A GI is an official description of an Australian wine region, designed to protect the use of the regional name under international law.

Wine labelled “Yarra Valley” must consist of at least 85% Yarra Valley fruit.  This upholds label integrity and safeguards the consumer.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.