Seedlip - 'Spice 94' Aromatic Non-Alcoholic Distilled Spirit

$65.00
Sale price

Regular price $65.00

A complex blend of aromatic Jamaican allspice berry and cardamom distillates with two barks and a bright citrus finish.  Simply serve with tonic and a red grapefruit peel garnish.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

SEEDLIP

Over three hundred years ago, it was common for physicians to distil herbal remedies using copper stills, harnessing the power of nature & alchemy to solve medical maladies. In 1651, one such physician, John French, published The Art of Distillation documenting these non-alcoholic recipes. At that same time, a family in Lincolnshire had started farming, hand sowing seeds using baskets called ‘seedlips’.

Centuries later, Ben stumbled across John French’s recipes & began experimenting with them in his kitchen, using a small copper still & herbs from his garden. That might have been the end of the story, if he hadn’t been given a sickly sweet pink mocktail one Monday evening in a restaurant. The result was the beginning of an idea to combine his farming heritage, love of nature, his copper still & forgotten recipes with the need for proper non-alcoholic options; a name inspired by the seed baskets carried by his family centuries before & a process of Seed to Lip: and so Seedlip was born.

GREEN SHOOTS

Following two years of experimentation to develop a bespoke distillation process for each individual ingredient, Seedlip’s aromatic Spice 94 debuted in Selfridges in late 2015, the very first batch of 1000 bottles sold out in just three weeks, the next in three days, and the third 1000 in less than half an hour. Iconic bars, hotels & restaurants like The Fat Duck, The Clove Club, Dandelyan, The Savoy, The Ritz & The Hand & Flowers, even Buckingham Palace were soon in touch. The demand was clear.

The herbal Garden 108 using Peas picked from the family farm would follow, the team grew, as did the list of impressive customers. New cities were launched, awards were won, new cocktails developed & the demand continued to show the need & potential of leading this movement of considered options for those not drinking alcohol.

BUD TO BLOOM

What began in a kitchen in the woods is now part of a worldwide revolution - the way we drink is indeed changing. The days of lime & soda are over, sugary carbonated or fruit juice-based drinks just won’t do.

FIRST HARVEST

Two gold medals at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, a second office in Los Angeles, the creation of the NOgroni® for the World’s 50 Best Bar Awards, publishing a recipe book with Penguin, the recent launch of the citrus blend, Grove 42, an exclusive one night edition of the first dark Distilled non-alcoholic Spirit Harvest 36 & the global launch of the first ever NO & LO alcohol cocktail concept (Nolo®) are just some of the many highlights Seedlip is both proud & humbled to have experienced in just 140 weeks!

Today, you can find Seedlip in 20x international cities, over 250 top-rated restaurants, many of the world’s best cocktail bars, luxury hotels & high quality retailers. So regardless of why you’re not drinking alcohol, you should have the choice of a grown up, complex drink. Full stop.

 

 

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

A complex blend of aromatic Jamaican allspice berry and cardamom distillates with two barks and a bright citrus finish.  Simply serve with tonic and a red grapefruit peel garnish.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

SEEDLIP

Over three hundred years ago, it was common for physicians to distil herbal remedies using copper stills, harnessing the power of nature & alchemy to solve medical maladies. In 1651, one such physician, John French, published The Art of Distillation documenting these non-alcoholic recipes. At that same time, a family in Lincolnshire had started farming, hand sowing seeds using baskets called ‘seedlips’.

Centuries later, Ben stumbled across John French’s recipes & began experimenting with them in his kitchen, using a small copper still & herbs from his garden. That might have been the end of the story, if he hadn’t been given a sickly sweet pink mocktail one Monday evening in a restaurant. The result was the beginning of an idea to combine his farming heritage, love of nature, his copper still & forgotten recipes with the need for proper non-alcoholic options; a name inspired by the seed baskets carried by his family centuries before & a process of Seed to Lip: and so Seedlip was born.

GREEN SHOOTS

Following two years of experimentation to develop a bespoke distillation process for each individual ingredient, Seedlip’s aromatic Spice 94 debuted in Selfridges in late 2015, the very first batch of 1000 bottles sold out in just three weeks, the next in three days, and the third 1000 in less than half an hour. Iconic bars, hotels & restaurants like The Fat Duck, The Clove Club, Dandelyan, The Savoy, The Ritz & The Hand & Flowers, even Buckingham Palace were soon in touch. The demand was clear.

The herbal Garden 108 using Peas picked from the family farm would follow, the team grew, as did the list of impressive customers. New cities were launched, awards were won, new cocktails developed & the demand continued to show the need & potential of leading this movement of considered options for those not drinking alcohol.

BUD TO BLOOM

What began in a kitchen in the woods is now part of a worldwide revolution - the way we drink is indeed changing. The days of lime & soda are over, sugary carbonated or fruit juice-based drinks just won’t do.

FIRST HARVEST

Two gold medals at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, a second office in Los Angeles, the creation of the NOgroni® for the World’s 50 Best Bar Awards, publishing a recipe book with Penguin, the recent launch of the citrus blend, Grove 42, an exclusive one night edition of the first dark Distilled non-alcoholic Spirit Harvest 36 & the global launch of the first ever NO & LO alcohol cocktail concept (Nolo®) are just some of the many highlights Seedlip is both proud & humbled to have experienced in just 140 weeks!

Today, you can find Seedlip in 20x international cities, over 250 top-rated restaurants, many of the world’s best cocktail bars, luxury hotels & high quality retailers. So regardless of why you’re not drinking alcohol, you should have the choice of a grown up, complex drink. Full stop.

 

 

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.