Mondillo - Bendigo Pinot Noir 2016

$49.00
Sale price

Regular price $49.00

"Full-bodied with ripe dark cherry aromas and a concentrated core of berry fruits. The seductively smooth palate packed with fragrant spices, blackberries, chocolate, violets and soft oak.

The 2016 Bendigo growing season began with warm weather and light summer breezes that provided a disease free environment for perfect flowering, an even berry set, and clean fruit. A warm summer lead to a dry sunny Autumn - harvest conditions were dry and calm.

The fruit was hand harvested, 100% de-stemmed followed by a long cold maceration, fermented slowly and gently pressed. It has been aged in French oak barriques, of which 30% were new for 11 months.

Drink/Cellar: Now until 2022

Serve with stuffed eggplant, rich tomato/mushroom based recipes, pork, beef and lamb dishes."

5 Stars - Michael Cooper 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mondillo

Passion for his vineyard, an inherent love of the environment, and a desire to produce exquisite wines year after year… these are the driving forces behind Domenic Mondillo.

Born in Rhode Island in the United States, Domenic is the grandson of Italian immigrants. His Italian heritage is steeped in many generations of cooking great food and making superb wine. Enjoying strong family traditions and values, his Italian Grandfather taught him the secrets of making fine wine in the cellar amongst the home-made preserves, prosciutto and Italian cheeses. Domenic learned the art of drinking wine at his grandfather’s table, fuelling his taste at an early age for pairing wine and food.

With a degree in Culinary Arts from Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island USA, Domenic moved to New Zealand in 1981 and made his culinary mark in Queenstown as the owner and executive chef of two multi award-winning restaurants, before being enticed full-time into the world of wine in 1992.

Achieving Viticulture and Oenology qualifications Domenic has been instrumental in designing and developing vineyards throughout Central Otago, together with over 25 winemaking vintages in Oregon, USA.

Domenic, and his New Zealand wife Ally, established their own vineyard at Bendigo in 2001, with the desire to have a range of Pinot Noir and Riesling wines that are best showcased when paired with fabulous cuisine and, of course, great company.

Queenstown is home to Domenic and Ally; with skiing, golf, fly fishing and hiking, the region is “like heaven on earth". Here we have it all – spectacular views, fresh water, native forests, mountains and birdlife – and, of course, unrivalled wine-growing country.”

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Central Otago

A spectacular landscape and sophisticated tourist culture also home to some of the world’s best Pinot Noir, not to mention impressive, vivid white wines.

All of the main winegrowing sub-regions lie within close reach, with the distinctive mountainous terrain providing each with a unique climate, aspect and altitude.

Pinot Noir flourishes in the Central Otago, with a variety of stunning expressions being crafted in the numerous sub-regions.

The region is also renowned for producing excellent aromatics: Chardonnay, Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc.

Historically noted as ‘pre-eminently suitable’ for winemaking (Bragato, 1895), the region’s first Gold Medal was for ‘Burgundy’ in Sydney in 1881. 

Stonefruit prevailed until a resurgence in the 1950s, followed by a significant commitment by the 1970s wine-growing pioneers, enduring today in names such as Chard Farm, Rippon, Black Ridge and Gibbston Valley.

Central Otago is a tourism stronghold, captivating visitors with a wide range of excellent cellar door facilities and wine-tourism activities. Soaring snow-capped mountains and glistening rivers nestled deep within ravines (gold rush territory in the 1800s) draw visitors from far and wide.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Full-bodied with ripe dark cherry aromas and a concentrated core of berry fruits. The seductively smooth palate packed with fragrant spices, blackberries, chocolate, violets and soft oak.

The 2016 Bendigo growing season began with warm weather and light summer breezes that provided a disease free environment for perfect flowering, an even berry set, and clean fruit. A warm summer lead to a dry sunny Autumn - harvest conditions were dry and calm.

The fruit was hand harvested, 100% de-stemmed followed by a long cold maceration, fermented slowly and gently pressed. It has been aged in French oak barriques, of which 30% were new for 11 months.

Drink/Cellar: Now until 2022

Serve with stuffed eggplant, rich tomato/mushroom based recipes, pork, beef and lamb dishes."

5 Stars - Michael Cooper 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mondillo

Passion for his vineyard, an inherent love of the environment, and a desire to produce exquisite wines year after year… these are the driving forces behind Domenic Mondillo.

Born in Rhode Island in the United States, Domenic is the grandson of Italian immigrants. His Italian heritage is steeped in many generations of cooking great food and making superb wine. Enjoying strong family traditions and values, his Italian Grandfather taught him the secrets of making fine wine in the cellar amongst the home-made preserves, prosciutto and Italian cheeses. Domenic learned the art of drinking wine at his grandfather’s table, fuelling his taste at an early age for pairing wine and food.

With a degree in Culinary Arts from Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island USA, Domenic moved to New Zealand in 1981 and made his culinary mark in Queenstown as the owner and executive chef of two multi award-winning restaurants, before being enticed full-time into the world of wine in 1992.

Achieving Viticulture and Oenology qualifications Domenic has been instrumental in designing and developing vineyards throughout Central Otago, together with over 25 winemaking vintages in Oregon, USA.

Domenic, and his New Zealand wife Ally, established their own vineyard at Bendigo in 2001, with the desire to have a range of Pinot Noir and Riesling wines that are best showcased when paired with fabulous cuisine and, of course, great company.

Queenstown is home to Domenic and Ally; with skiing, golf, fly fishing and hiking, the region is “like heaven on earth". Here we have it all – spectacular views, fresh water, native forests, mountains and birdlife – and, of course, unrivalled wine-growing country.”

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Central Otago

A spectacular landscape and sophisticated tourist culture also home to some of the world’s best Pinot Noir, not to mention impressive, vivid white wines.

All of the main winegrowing sub-regions lie within close reach, with the distinctive mountainous terrain providing each with a unique climate, aspect and altitude.

Pinot Noir flourishes in the Central Otago, with a variety of stunning expressions being crafted in the numerous sub-regions.

The region is also renowned for producing excellent aromatics: Chardonnay, Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc.

Historically noted as ‘pre-eminently suitable’ for winemaking (Bragato, 1895), the region’s first Gold Medal was for ‘Burgundy’ in Sydney in 1881. 

Stonefruit prevailed until a resurgence in the 1950s, followed by a significant commitment by the 1970s wine-growing pioneers, enduring today in names such as Chard Farm, Rippon, Black Ridge and Gibbston Valley.

Central Otago is a tourism stronghold, captivating visitors with a wide range of excellent cellar door facilities and wine-tourism activities. Soaring snow-capped mountains and glistening rivers nestled deep within ravines (gold rush territory in the 1800s) draw visitors from far and wide.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.