Prunotto - Roero Arneis 2017 DOCG

$28.00
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Regular price $28.00

Roero Arneis is straw yellow in colour with light greenish hues. Its nose is intense with floral and fruity notes. The palate is notable for its good structure sustained by pleasant freshness and a lengthy finish. 

The grapes were harvested into baskets, gently pressed and the clarified juice was separated from the must by using a cold temperature decanting method. Fermentation was conducted at a controlled temperature that did not exceed 18 °C (64 °F) for approximately 15 days. Before bottling, the wine aged in stainless steel tanks at a controlled low temperature for several months.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Prunotto

Prunotto is located in Alba, in the heart of The Langhe, halfway between Barbaresco and Barolo, on the southeast side of the Tanaro River on a gentle hillside surrounded by vineyards stretching throughout The Langhe and Roero.
Cantina Sociale "Ai Vini delle Langhe", a winemaking co-op, was incorporated in 1904 in the city council room of Serralunga's Town Hall presided by Mr. Giacomo Oddero, a notary public and a youthful Alfredo Prunotto as a witness. Among those present at the ceremony were prominent citizens who made important contributions to the history of Alba and the surrounding communities, as well as many small local producers. The first harvest took place in 1905. Unfortunately the following years were burdened by an uncertain economic trend worsened by the effects of the First World War. On the deadline for renewal of the Cantina Social’s by-laws in 1922, many of its members changed their minds and no longer delivered their grapes to the co-op. The vintage was exceptional but was not abundant. The winery began to have serious financial difficulties and was put into liquidation.
In the middle of this predicament, Alfredo Prunotto met and married Luigina. Together they decided to take over the "Ai Vini delle Langhe" co-op and gave it their name. Their dedication and passion soon made the winery famous and it began exporting Barolo and Barbaresco all over the globe: first to South America and then to The United States, two markets that had recently opened to foreign trade. Prunotto was one of the few companies that believed in this commercial strategy.
In 1956, Alfredo Prunotto decided to retire and he sold the company to wine technician and friend Beppe Colla who was assisted by Carlo Filiberti and later by his brother Tino Colla. As early as 1961, the owners of Prunotto began to identify specific production areas, well-know vineyards of excellence, and began single vineyard vinification to produce the very best crus such as Barolo Bussia and Barbera d’Alba Pian Romualdo. In 1972, a new winery was designed by architect Ugo della Piana, a native of this northern area of Piedmont. The winery was built near the city of Alba where Prunotto's main offices are still located today.
The Antinori family first became involved with the Prunotto winery in 1989 initially handling distribution and then in 1994, when the Colla brothers decided to retire, they took over production upholding the excellent quality standards that Alfredo Prunotto successfully achieved. The winery's production philosophy, always extremely attentive to details and deeply passionate about wine, brought Prunotto and the Antinori family together to face a new challenge: to explore and develop the potential of this new terroir where both local and international varieties can express the area's remarkable territorial identity.
In 1990 this project took shape when Albiera Antinori, Marchese Piero Antinori’s eldest daughter, further defined the winery's personality by concentrating on the vineyards: the first was the Bussia vineyard, one of the most prestigious in the Barolo area followed by Costamiòle in Agliano to produce Nizza, and land in Calliano for research and development for introducing vines new to this area such as Albarossa and Syrah.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Arneis

The Italian white grape Arneis is getting popular worldwide, but fifty years ago it was almost extinct. Originally planted to distract the birds from Piedmont’s more important red variety, Nebbiolo, Arneis was named ‘Little Rascal’ because it was also a troublesome crop, yielding small quantities of disease-prone fruit. But a hard-working local producer revealed the variety’s inherent charms and while it’s famous expression is still Piedmont’s Roero DOCG, producers in cooler climates from California to Australia and New Zealand produce typical Arneis with its elegantly fresh but aromatic nature, subtle pear and stonefruit flavours and perhaps even the classic note of almond.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Roero Arneis is straw yellow in colour with light greenish hues. Its nose is intense with floral and fruity notes. The palate is notable for its good structure sustained by pleasant freshness and a lengthy finish. 

The grapes were harvested into baskets, gently pressed and the clarified juice was separated from the must by using a cold temperature decanting method. Fermentation was conducted at a controlled temperature that did not exceed 18 °C (64 °F) for approximately 15 days. Before bottling, the wine aged in stainless steel tanks at a controlled low temperature for several months.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Prunotto

Prunotto is located in Alba, in the heart of The Langhe, halfway between Barbaresco and Barolo, on the southeast side of the Tanaro River on a gentle hillside surrounded by vineyards stretching throughout The Langhe and Roero.
Cantina Sociale "Ai Vini delle Langhe", a winemaking co-op, was incorporated in 1904 in the city council room of Serralunga's Town Hall presided by Mr. Giacomo Oddero, a notary public and a youthful Alfredo Prunotto as a witness. Among those present at the ceremony were prominent citizens who made important contributions to the history of Alba and the surrounding communities, as well as many small local producers. The first harvest took place in 1905. Unfortunately the following years were burdened by an uncertain economic trend worsened by the effects of the First World War. On the deadline for renewal of the Cantina Social’s by-laws in 1922, many of its members changed their minds and no longer delivered their grapes to the co-op. The vintage was exceptional but was not abundant. The winery began to have serious financial difficulties and was put into liquidation.
In the middle of this predicament, Alfredo Prunotto met and married Luigina. Together they decided to take over the "Ai Vini delle Langhe" co-op and gave it their name. Their dedication and passion soon made the winery famous and it began exporting Barolo and Barbaresco all over the globe: first to South America and then to The United States, two markets that had recently opened to foreign trade. Prunotto was one of the few companies that believed in this commercial strategy.
In 1956, Alfredo Prunotto decided to retire and he sold the company to wine technician and friend Beppe Colla who was assisted by Carlo Filiberti and later by his brother Tino Colla. As early as 1961, the owners of Prunotto began to identify specific production areas, well-know vineyards of excellence, and began single vineyard vinification to produce the very best crus such as Barolo Bussia and Barbera d’Alba Pian Romualdo. In 1972, a new winery was designed by architect Ugo della Piana, a native of this northern area of Piedmont. The winery was built near the city of Alba where Prunotto's main offices are still located today.
The Antinori family first became involved with the Prunotto winery in 1989 initially handling distribution and then in 1994, when the Colla brothers decided to retire, they took over production upholding the excellent quality standards that Alfredo Prunotto successfully achieved. The winery's production philosophy, always extremely attentive to details and deeply passionate about wine, brought Prunotto and the Antinori family together to face a new challenge: to explore and develop the potential of this new terroir where both local and international varieties can express the area's remarkable territorial identity.
In 1990 this project took shape when Albiera Antinori, Marchese Piero Antinori’s eldest daughter, further defined the winery's personality by concentrating on the vineyards: the first was the Bussia vineyard, one of the most prestigious in the Barolo area followed by Costamiòle in Agliano to produce Nizza, and land in Calliano for research and development for introducing vines new to this area such as Albarossa and Syrah.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Arneis

The Italian white grape Arneis is getting popular worldwide, but fifty years ago it was almost extinct. Originally planted to distract the birds from Piedmont’s more important red variety, Nebbiolo, Arneis was named ‘Little Rascal’ because it was also a troublesome crop, yielding small quantities of disease-prone fruit. But a hard-working local producer revealed the variety’s inherent charms and while it’s famous expression is still Piedmont’s Roero DOCG, producers in cooler climates from California to Australia and New Zealand produce typical Arneis with its elegantly fresh but aromatic nature, subtle pear and stonefruit flavours and perhaps even the classic note of almond.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.