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Tchotiashvili Saperavi Rcheuli 2016

$68.00
Sale price

Regular price $68.00

"The vineyard is located at the bottom of the Caucasus mountains on the left from river Alazani in Kakheti, Georgia. It was planted at 480 metres above sea level in 1991 on the humus-carbonated soil. The wine was made with the old Kakhetian traditional technology: Qvevri. The maceration period was 3.5 month in contact with skin and stems. There are no additives and sulphur is used only as disinfection of the Qvevris. The wine is unfiltered. The colour is dark cherry red, for the nose you can smell red berries and for tasting – high acidity with the  long lasting flavour. It pairs with light cheese and roasted meat.

Under the mark of “Rcheuli Qvevri” are put together the best samples of the vintage which are made by using centuries-old technology. Each bottle is under strict control and it is allowed for sale only after the signature of the oenologist. The quantity is limited; each bottle has its own unique number. 

100% natural wine of Saperavi grape variety. It is made in Qvevri using traditional centuries-old technology. It has all properties typical for wine made in Qvevri: high nutrition value, therapeutic modality. It also strengthens immunity.

Wine is rich with phenolic compounds and vitamins of various groups. It is differentiated with the high content of “PP” vitamin which feeds the cardiovascular system.

Colour - dark red.

Pronounced varietal aroma.

Taste – long-lasting and pleasant.

It does not contain bioactive additives and components.

Alcohol: 13.5%."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tchotiashvili

Our company "Satsnakheli" produces 100% of natural, highest quality wines.

 The knowledge and experience of family wine making, passed on from generation to generation, together with already dedication to wine making, and our own vineyards located in unique geographic zone, as well as the technological lines produced by the widely known brands and the scientific approach gives us the opportunity to produce premium wines in small quantities.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Saperavi

Saperavi is a dark-skinned, pink-fleshed grape variety originally from the Georgian Republic. Being the Georgian-language word for "dye", saperavi is a particularly appropriate name for this teinturier variety.

Saperavi vines are grown widely throughout the Caucasus (the crossover between the Asian and European continents), and further afield in various regions of the former Soviet Republic. Capable of bringing intense colour and marked acidity to wines. In recent decades, it has also proved itself capable of producing ageworthy varietal wines of high quality. In Georgia, Saperavi's best expression comes from its premier region Kakheti, near the eastern border with Azerbaijan.

A late-ripening variety, Saperavi thrives in the cooler climates of continental eastern Europe where it produces generous yields and without compromising quality too drastically.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Georgia

Georgia is the country where winemaking and viticulture comes from - until proven otherwise. It is where the oldest grape vines and winemaking equipment have been found - some of which that dates back to 6,000BC. It is home to many refreshing whites and red, as well as the home of many top orange wines.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"The vineyard is located at the bottom of the Caucasus mountains on the left from river Alazani in Kakheti, Georgia. It was planted at 480 metres above sea level in 1991 on the humus-carbonated soil. The wine was made with the old Kakhetian traditional technology: Qvevri. The maceration period was 3.5 month in contact with skin and stems. There are no additives and sulphur is used only as disinfection of the Qvevris. The wine is unfiltered. The colour is dark cherry red, for the nose you can smell red berries and for tasting – high acidity with the  long lasting flavour. It pairs with light cheese and roasted meat.

Under the mark of “Rcheuli Qvevri” are put together the best samples of the vintage which are made by using centuries-old technology. Each bottle is under strict control and it is allowed for sale only after the signature of the oenologist. The quantity is limited; each bottle has its own unique number. 

100% natural wine of Saperavi grape variety. It is made in Qvevri using traditional centuries-old technology. It has all properties typical for wine made in Qvevri: high nutrition value, therapeutic modality. It also strengthens immunity.

Wine is rich with phenolic compounds and vitamins of various groups. It is differentiated with the high content of “PP” vitamin which feeds the cardiovascular system.

Colour - dark red.

Pronounced varietal aroma.

Taste – long-lasting and pleasant.

It does not contain bioactive additives and components.

Alcohol: 13.5%."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tchotiashvili

Our company "Satsnakheli" produces 100% of natural, highest quality wines.

 The knowledge and experience of family wine making, passed on from generation to generation, together with already dedication to wine making, and our own vineyards located in unique geographic zone, as well as the technological lines produced by the widely known brands and the scientific approach gives us the opportunity to produce premium wines in small quantities.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Saperavi

Saperavi is a dark-skinned, pink-fleshed grape variety originally from the Georgian Republic. Being the Georgian-language word for "dye", saperavi is a particularly appropriate name for this teinturier variety.

Saperavi vines are grown widely throughout the Caucasus (the crossover between the Asian and European continents), and further afield in various regions of the former Soviet Republic. Capable of bringing intense colour and marked acidity to wines. In recent decades, it has also proved itself capable of producing ageworthy varietal wines of high quality. In Georgia, Saperavi's best expression comes from its premier region Kakheti, near the eastern border with Azerbaijan.

A late-ripening variety, Saperavi thrives in the cooler climates of continental eastern Europe where it produces generous yields and without compromising quality too drastically.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Georgia

Georgia is the country where winemaking and viticulture comes from - until proven otherwise. It is where the oldest grape vines and winemaking equipment have been found - some of which that dates back to 6,000BC. It is home to many refreshing whites and red, as well as the home of many top orange wines.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.