Kopke - 20 Years Old Tawny Porto

$95.00
Sale price

Regular price $95.00

TASTING NOTES A delicate orange-green colour. Its splendid nose is a complex marriage of dried fruit, spice and notes of fine wood. On the palate, its flavours are rich and concentrated, with a long and velvety finish.

VINIFICATION Hand-picked at the optimum time, the grapes are then de-stemmed, crushed and converted into wine through a process of careful maceration to extract their colour, tannins and aromas, enhanced by constant churning during fermentation. This takes place in vats (lagares) at a controlled temperature (between 28-30°C) until the right degree of sweetness is achieved. At this point, grape brandy is added to create the final fortified wine. A wine of high quality, made by blending wines of different harvests to achieve the array of sensory qualities that are typical of these aged tawny Port wines. These wines have each matured in oak casks for varied periods of time, with the average age of all the wines in the blend defining the age on the label. The resulting blend expresses the characteristics given by the ageing in wood. 

RECOMMENDATIONS Irresistible with a starter of foie gras with aubergine and walnuts. A great choice for an endless array of desserts, such as toffee brownies, chocolate and pistachio pavé, or crostini of walnuts with chèvre. Best served at a temperature between 12 and 14°C.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Kopke

Kopke's path as a winegrower is entwined with the history of its location. The Douro was destined to become the chosen stage for this marriage between the will of man and nature took place.

A journey in 1636 between Hamburg and Portugal is the beginning of a long story: Nicolau Kopkë settles in Portugal as Consul General of the Hanseatic League.  Two years later, in 1638, the first bottles of wine are shipped to the North of Europe.

The purchase of a farm in the Douro, in 1781, marks the transition from a wine buying company to a major producer.

Port Wine gradually become the focus of the company and soon represents its main business. Nicolau Kopkë & Co. is an example for innovation, producing and shipping its wines within the same company.

In 1828 Cristiano Nicolau Kopkë, great-great-grandson of the company's founder Nicolau Kopkë and grandson of Cristiano Kopke, sided with the Liberal Party during the civil war, thus linking the company and the family to the cause.
This dedication to the concept of social progress will be shared by all the family's successive generations.

He was graced with the title of Baron of Vilar in 1836 and, ten years later, his nephew Joaquim Augusto Kopke was made Baron of Massarelos. Two centuries after the arrival of the family in Portugal, their commitment to the development of the country had been rewarded.

The company changed its name to C. N. Kopke in 1841, remaining as such to this day.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Douro Valley

The Douro Valley is by far the most important and well-known region in all of Portugal. It has the longest history of winemaking as well. The Douro is practically synonymous with Port - the fortified wine that is made in the region, though in recent years 'table wine' has become modernised and more popular.


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

TASTING NOTES A delicate orange-green colour. Its splendid nose is a complex marriage of dried fruit, spice and notes of fine wood. On the palate, its flavours are rich and concentrated, with a long and velvety finish.

VINIFICATION Hand-picked at the optimum time, the grapes are then de-stemmed, crushed and converted into wine through a process of careful maceration to extract their colour, tannins and aromas, enhanced by constant churning during fermentation. This takes place in vats (lagares) at a controlled temperature (between 28-30°C) until the right degree of sweetness is achieved. At this point, grape brandy is added to create the final fortified wine. A wine of high quality, made by blending wines of different harvests to achieve the array of sensory qualities that are typical of these aged tawny Port wines. These wines have each matured in oak casks for varied periods of time, with the average age of all the wines in the blend defining the age on the label. The resulting blend expresses the characteristics given by the ageing in wood. 

RECOMMENDATIONS Irresistible with a starter of foie gras with aubergine and walnuts. A great choice for an endless array of desserts, such as toffee brownies, chocolate and pistachio pavé, or crostini of walnuts with chèvre. Best served at a temperature between 12 and 14°C.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Kopke

Kopke's path as a winegrower is entwined with the history of its location. The Douro was destined to become the chosen stage for this marriage between the will of man and nature took place.

A journey in 1636 between Hamburg and Portugal is the beginning of a long story: Nicolau Kopkë settles in Portugal as Consul General of the Hanseatic League.  Two years later, in 1638, the first bottles of wine are shipped to the North of Europe.

The purchase of a farm in the Douro, in 1781, marks the transition from a wine buying company to a major producer.

Port Wine gradually become the focus of the company and soon represents its main business. Nicolau Kopkë & Co. is an example for innovation, producing and shipping its wines within the same company.

In 1828 Cristiano Nicolau Kopkë, great-great-grandson of the company's founder Nicolau Kopkë and grandson of Cristiano Kopke, sided with the Liberal Party during the civil war, thus linking the company and the family to the cause.
This dedication to the concept of social progress will be shared by all the family's successive generations.

He was graced with the title of Baron of Vilar in 1836 and, ten years later, his nephew Joaquim Augusto Kopke was made Baron of Massarelos. Two centuries after the arrival of the family in Portugal, their commitment to the development of the country had been rewarded.

The company changed its name to C. N. Kopke in 1841, remaining as such to this day.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Douro Valley

The Douro Valley is by far the most important and well-known region in all of Portugal. It has the longest history of winemaking as well. The Douro is practically synonymous with Port - the fortified wine that is made in the region, though in recent years 'table wine' has become modernised and more popular.


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.