Old Forester - Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whisky 700ml

$50.00
Sale price

Regular price $50.00

"Tasting Note: Created in 1870, Old Forester is the only bourbon continuously distilled and marketed by the founding family before, during and after Prohibition. At 80 proof, Old Forester delivers a genuine bourbon experience, with rich, full flavour and a smooth character that is ideal for sipping neat, on the rock, with a splash of water or in a classic cocktail."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Old Forester, Kentucky

Our founder, George Garvin Brown, was born September 2, 1846 in Munfordville, KY. In 1863 he moved to Louisville to attend high school, and eventually became a pharmaceutical salesman. And it was that particular line of work that led him to create the First Bottled Bourbon™, Old Forester, in 1870.

Old Forester is created by George Garvin Brown and named after Dr. William Forrester.

To guarantee consistency George batches bourbon from three nearby distilleries: Mattingly, Mellwood, and Atherton. He seals his whiskey exclusively in glass bottles and signs each bottle as his personal guarantee of its quality.

Old Forester was presented at 90 proof.

In order to comply with the legal regulations specified by the U.S. Bottled in Bond Act of 1897, Old Forester increases from 90 proof to 100 proof.

The U.S. Bottled in Bond Act of 1897 requires that bourbon come from one distillery and one distilling season, George Garvin Brown purchases the Mattingly Distillery in 1901.

Old Forester celebrates the 156th birthday of founder George Garvin Brown with the first release of Old Forester Birthday Bourbon™ on his birthday, Sept 2. 2002.

The Whiskey Row series launches, offering consumers a way to taste their way through our history. Four expressions complete the series, each representing a moment in Old Forester’s 150-year story: 1870 Original Batch Whisky, 1897 Bottled in Bond, 1910 Old Fine Whisky, and 1920 Style Prohibition Whisky.

Old Forester Distillery returns home to Whisky Row and opens at 119 W. Main Street, housed in the same building that the brand called home from 1882 – 1919. Old Forester distillery is the only downtown distillery which houses an active cooperage, charring barrels in the same facility where spirits are being aged.

In 1940, Owsley Brown acquired the Old Kentucky Distillery and along with it, the Normandy Rye Whiskey brand. After 40+ year absence, Old Forester proudly reintroduces the historic Rye grain recipe which features proprietary yeast, along with a mash bill of 65% Rye, 20% Malted Barley and 15% Corn, creating a unique, spicy, and floral member of the Old Forester family.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Tasting Note: Created in 1870, Old Forester is the only bourbon continuously distilled and marketed by the founding family before, during and after Prohibition. At 80 proof, Old Forester delivers a genuine bourbon experience, with rich, full flavour and a smooth character that is ideal for sipping neat, on the rock, with a splash of water or in a classic cocktail."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Old Forester, Kentucky

Our founder, George Garvin Brown, was born September 2, 1846 in Munfordville, KY. In 1863 he moved to Louisville to attend high school, and eventually became a pharmaceutical salesman. And it was that particular line of work that led him to create the First Bottled Bourbon™, Old Forester, in 1870.

Old Forester is created by George Garvin Brown and named after Dr. William Forrester.

To guarantee consistency George batches bourbon from three nearby distilleries: Mattingly, Mellwood, and Atherton. He seals his whiskey exclusively in glass bottles and signs each bottle as his personal guarantee of its quality.

Old Forester was presented at 90 proof.

In order to comply with the legal regulations specified by the U.S. Bottled in Bond Act of 1897, Old Forester increases from 90 proof to 100 proof.

The U.S. Bottled in Bond Act of 1897 requires that bourbon come from one distillery and one distilling season, George Garvin Brown purchases the Mattingly Distillery in 1901.

Old Forester celebrates the 156th birthday of founder George Garvin Brown with the first release of Old Forester Birthday Bourbon™ on his birthday, Sept 2. 2002.

The Whiskey Row series launches, offering consumers a way to taste their way through our history. Four expressions complete the series, each representing a moment in Old Forester’s 150-year story: 1870 Original Batch Whisky, 1897 Bottled in Bond, 1910 Old Fine Whisky, and 1920 Style Prohibition Whisky.

Old Forester Distillery returns home to Whisky Row and opens at 119 W. Main Street, housed in the same building that the brand called home from 1882 – 1919. Old Forester distillery is the only downtown distillery which houses an active cooperage, charring barrels in the same facility where spirits are being aged.

In 1940, Owsley Brown acquired the Old Kentucky Distillery and along with it, the Normandy Rye Whiskey brand. After 40+ year absence, Old Forester proudly reintroduces the historic Rye grain recipe which features proprietary yeast, along with a mash bill of 65% Rye, 20% Malted Barley and 15% Corn, creating a unique, spicy, and floral member of the Old Forester family.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.