Highland Park - 'Wings of the Eagle' 16 Year Old Single Malt Whisky

$210.00
Sale price

Regular price $210.00

According to the legends of our Viking ancestors, the might eagle which sits at the top of Yggdrasil, the sacred tree, represents wisdom and knowledge. The beating of its wings creates the winds that sweep across Earth.

Here, on Orkney, those earthly winds sweep across our island home too, reaching speeds of over 100 miles per hour in winter. No trees survive such onslaught, so our moorland peat is woodless, but rich in fragrant heather, producing the characteristic aromatic smokiness of our whisky.

16 YEAR OLD WINGS OF THE EAGLE celebrates our wild island climate. Its spicy and elegant character reveals a sophisticated combination of flavours, layered as intricately as the feathers of an eagle’s wing.

Nose: Shortbread, waxy orange peels, pine resin and a subtle waft of hickory smoke.

Palate: Smoke remains soft, letting notes of vanilla and mixed nuts lead the way.

Finish: Almond butter, a touch of tobacco, crunchy brown sugar.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Highland Park Distillery

Highland Park distillery is the northernmost single malt Scotch whisky distillery in the world, located on the Orkney Islands off the far north coast of Scotland, where the Atlantic Ocean turns into the North Sea.

The basic process at Highland Park is similar to that at other distilleries. However, there are some key differences that make Highland Park unique in the world of single malts.

Heathery peat: Highland Park is the only distillery in the world to use peat from Orkney. Exposed to the elements and pounded relentlessly by gale-force winds, few trees survive Orkney’s harsh conditions. In absence of trees, the peat the distillery burns to smoke its hand-malted barley is densely compacted heather dating back 4,000 - 9,000 years. This peat burns slowly, delivering the distinctive aromatic smoke the distillery is known for.

Temperate weather: Although rainy and windy, the islands of Orkney are blessed with a surprisingly temperate climate, providing the perfect environment for whisky casks to quietly mature at an even pace, without being exposed to extremes in temperature.

Sherry-seasoned oak casks: Between 60-80% of a whisky’s flavor comes the cask in which it matures. Highland Park uses casks made of either American or European oak. These are built by hand in Spain, filled with Oloroso Sherry and left to season for two years. The casks are then emptied and sent to Orkney where they are filled with the new make spirit and left to mature for at least a decade – and up to five in the case of Highland Park 50 Year Old.

Highland Park is considered by whisky insiders one of the greatest single malts in the world. It has been named "The Best Spirit in the World" on three separate occasions by F. Paul Pacult, America's foremost expert on distilled spirits. Its 25 Year Old whisky was the first spirit to ever receive a perfect 100-point score at the Ultimate Spirits Challenge. In 2018, two of its special distillery releases, The Light and The Dark were awarded a Double Gold medal each by the San Francisco World Spirits Competition. In 2019 and for the fourth year running, Highland Park took home the Ultimate Spirits Challenge's top honour, the Chairman's Trophy for Best in Category.

In 2018, Highland Park ranked #2 behind its sister distillery, The Macallan, in whisky auction sales driven by growing demand for the distillery's special releases.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

According to the legends of our Viking ancestors, the might eagle which sits at the top of Yggdrasil, the sacred tree, represents wisdom and knowledge. The beating of its wings creates the winds that sweep across Earth.

Here, on Orkney, those earthly winds sweep across our island home too, reaching speeds of over 100 miles per hour in winter. No trees survive such onslaught, so our moorland peat is woodless, but rich in fragrant heather, producing the characteristic aromatic smokiness of our whisky.

16 YEAR OLD WINGS OF THE EAGLE celebrates our wild island climate. Its spicy and elegant character reveals a sophisticated combination of flavours, layered as intricately as the feathers of an eagle’s wing.

Nose: Shortbread, waxy orange peels, pine resin and a subtle waft of hickory smoke.

Palate: Smoke remains soft, letting notes of vanilla and mixed nuts lead the way.

Finish: Almond butter, a touch of tobacco, crunchy brown sugar.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Highland Park Distillery

Highland Park distillery is the northernmost single malt Scotch whisky distillery in the world, located on the Orkney Islands off the far north coast of Scotland, where the Atlantic Ocean turns into the North Sea.

The basic process at Highland Park is similar to that at other distilleries. However, there are some key differences that make Highland Park unique in the world of single malts.

Heathery peat: Highland Park is the only distillery in the world to use peat from Orkney. Exposed to the elements and pounded relentlessly by gale-force winds, few trees survive Orkney’s harsh conditions. In absence of trees, the peat the distillery burns to smoke its hand-malted barley is densely compacted heather dating back 4,000 - 9,000 years. This peat burns slowly, delivering the distinctive aromatic smoke the distillery is known for.

Temperate weather: Although rainy and windy, the islands of Orkney are blessed with a surprisingly temperate climate, providing the perfect environment for whisky casks to quietly mature at an even pace, without being exposed to extremes in temperature.

Sherry-seasoned oak casks: Between 60-80% of a whisky’s flavor comes the cask in which it matures. Highland Park uses casks made of either American or European oak. These are built by hand in Spain, filled with Oloroso Sherry and left to season for two years. The casks are then emptied and sent to Orkney where they are filled with the new make spirit and left to mature for at least a decade – and up to five in the case of Highland Park 50 Year Old.

Highland Park is considered by whisky insiders one of the greatest single malts in the world. It has been named "The Best Spirit in the World" on three separate occasions by F. Paul Pacult, America's foremost expert on distilled spirits. Its 25 Year Old whisky was the first spirit to ever receive a perfect 100-point score at the Ultimate Spirits Challenge. In 2018, two of its special distillery releases, The Light and The Dark were awarded a Double Gold medal each by the San Francisco World Spirits Competition. In 2019 and for the fourth year running, Highland Park took home the Ultimate Spirits Challenge's top honour, the Chairman's Trophy for Best in Category.

In 2018, Highland Park ranked #2 behind its sister distillery, The Macallan, in whisky auction sales driven by growing demand for the distillery's special releases.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.