Gachot Monot - Coteaux Bourguignon 2018

$33.00
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Regular price $33.00

"85% Gamay and 15% Pinot Noir. This wine is typical of its classification: agreeable, fruity and quaffable. Its Gamay heart makes a very good summer wine to be consumed within three to five years following bottling."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Gachot Monot

Based in the village of Corgoloin, and away from the limelight shining on producers further north in Nuits Saint Georges or south in Beaune, Damien Gachot and his wife Lise work 18 hectares mainly planted in Pinot Noir. Damien started in 1990 and has expanded the Domaine to its present state. Today, the vineyard with its parcels spread across the villages of Corgoloin, Comblanchien, Nuits St Georges, Chambolle-Musigny & St Aubin. Damien and his team of qualified winegrowers watch over their vines with great care. The all vineyard is cultivated according to a philosophy of respect for the soil and the vine.

 

--------THE GRAPES--------

Gamay Noir

Gamay is the red grape of the Beaujolais region which is sandwiched between Burgundy and the Rhone Valley in France. Consequently it is almost like an amalgam of Pinot Noir (of Burgundy) and the Syrah (of the Rhone) as it is light and floral in flavour but with a deeper colour. The best examples are found amongst the 10 grand cru regions of Beaujolais where it produces wines with depth and red and purple fruit flavours.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"85% Gamay and 15% Pinot Noir. This wine is typical of its classification: agreeable, fruity and quaffable. Its Gamay heart makes a very good summer wine to be consumed within three to five years following bottling."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Gachot Monot

Based in the village of Corgoloin, and away from the limelight shining on producers further north in Nuits Saint Georges or south in Beaune, Damien Gachot and his wife Lise work 18 hectares mainly planted in Pinot Noir. Damien started in 1990 and has expanded the Domaine to its present state. Today, the vineyard with its parcels spread across the villages of Corgoloin, Comblanchien, Nuits St Georges, Chambolle-Musigny & St Aubin. Damien and his team of qualified winegrowers watch over their vines with great care. The all vineyard is cultivated according to a philosophy of respect for the soil and the vine.

 

--------THE GRAPES--------

Gamay Noir

Gamay is the red grape of the Beaujolais region which is sandwiched between Burgundy and the Rhone Valley in France. Consequently it is almost like an amalgam of Pinot Noir (of Burgundy) and the Syrah (of the Rhone) as it is light and floral in flavour but with a deeper colour. The best examples are found amongst the 10 grand cru regions of Beaujolais where it produces wines with depth and red and purple fruit flavours.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.