Barbeito - 10 year old Verdelho 'Reserva Velha' Madeira 750ml

$100.00
Sale price

Regular price $100.00

TASTING NOTES AND HARMONIES

Golden colour.  Light polished wood, ripe citrus, floral notes, white sultanas and honey. Smooth texture, mineral touch with a fresh and energetic acidity and a lingering finish.  Excellent as an aperitif, consommé, smoked salmon, dried ham, pates or spaghetti with clams and orange.

GRAPE VARIETIES

Verdelho

VINEYARDS AND VINIFICATION

Grapes from various quality vineyards from São Vicente and Prazeres. Grapes were pressed in a continuous press. Arresting of fermentation takes place at the desired degree of sweetness by adding vinic alcohol (96%).

LOT

Verdelho aged in French oak casks for over 10 years by Canteiro method. For this blend we selected wines from our warehouses with stable temperatures year round, originating well balanced wines in sugar and acidity.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Alcohol: 19.20 Vol.
Baume: 1.8
Total sugar: 71 g/l
Volatile Acidity: 0.78
Total Acidity: 6.54
pH: 3.27

SERVING & CELLARAGE

This wine was naturally aged in casks and bottled in its purest state. To show it at its best serve between 11oC/12oC. Should be kept in a cool dry place. This wine was filtered and does not require decanting. It was bottled ready for drinking and will keep well several months after opening.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Barbeito

As Madeira houses go, we go about our business a little differently from the other surviving companies. We age their wines 100% naturally in old French oak in warm warehouses (known as the more expensive Canteiro process), rather than by heat-treating them in tanks. We do not add caramel to colour and further sweeten the wines nor do not de-acidify, which helps retain freshness.


In the early years our company concentrated its efforts in the production of bottled wine. New concepts of marketing in the Madeira wine business were introduced as well as innovative packaging like the wickered flagon. The quality of our wines gained an excellent reputation among consumers which helped to strenghten Barbeito’s image in the international market.

As time went by our company increased its activities and ended up involved in the bulk wine business in the beginning of the 70’s. This involvement brought many changes in Barbeito’s daily operations due to an excessive growth in production.

The competition among exporters in the bulk wine business was very high and small companies like ours had to strive to keep that area of business active and profitable.

However, during the 80’s we started realizing that Barbeito’s involvement in that kind of exports were damaging the quality of the bottled wine that was produced.

The difficult decision to stop exporting wine in bulk only came in 1991 with the entrance of Ricardo Vasconcelos Freitas to the company. In fact, 1991 was the year of the beginning of many changes in Vinhos Barbeito, being one of the most important the joint venture with the Kinoshita family, with whom we had already a close commercial and personal relationship since 1967. This decision enabled us to concentrate our efforts in just ageing, producing and blending the best quality wines. It was like going back to the past, when our grandfather just wanted to produce and sell good bottled wine, even if only in small quantities.


In 1991 another important change occurred in our company: for first time someone from our family became responsible for the making of the wine. In 1993, after two years learning the “secrets” of our wines’ style and character as well as studying modern techniques of wine making, Ricardo Freitas faced alone his first grape harvest.  Thinking of the future, we began building a working team in which all members work under the same motto: produce good quality wines with a unique style.

Since then Vinhos Barbeito never stopped investing in the purchase of good quality grapes to make fine wines. To achieve that goal, year after year, we work to establish closer relationships with farmers.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Madeira

The fantastic jungle of an island just off the coast of Portugal. It produces some still wines too but it is famous for the wine named after the island itself. It is a fortified wine made in a unique process.  It can be nutty and dry to biscuity and sweet. A range of noble white grapes, including Malvasia, are used to produce these diverse and delectable fortified wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

TASTING NOTES AND HARMONIES

Golden colour.  Light polished wood, ripe citrus, floral notes, white sultanas and honey. Smooth texture, mineral touch with a fresh and energetic acidity and a lingering finish.  Excellent as an aperitif, consommé, smoked salmon, dried ham, pates or spaghetti with clams and orange.

GRAPE VARIETIES

Verdelho

VINEYARDS AND VINIFICATION

Grapes from various quality vineyards from São Vicente and Prazeres. Grapes were pressed in a continuous press. Arresting of fermentation takes place at the desired degree of sweetness by adding vinic alcohol (96%).

LOT

Verdelho aged in French oak casks for over 10 years by Canteiro method. For this blend we selected wines from our warehouses with stable temperatures year round, originating well balanced wines in sugar and acidity.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Alcohol: 19.20 Vol.
Baume: 1.8
Total sugar: 71 g/l
Volatile Acidity: 0.78
Total Acidity: 6.54
pH: 3.27

SERVING & CELLARAGE

This wine was naturally aged in casks and bottled in its purest state. To show it at its best serve between 11oC/12oC. Should be kept in a cool dry place. This wine was filtered and does not require decanting. It was bottled ready for drinking and will keep well several months after opening.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Barbeito

As Madeira houses go, we go about our business a little differently from the other surviving companies. We age their wines 100% naturally in old French oak in warm warehouses (known as the more expensive Canteiro process), rather than by heat-treating them in tanks. We do not add caramel to colour and further sweeten the wines nor do not de-acidify, which helps retain freshness.


In the early years our company concentrated its efforts in the production of bottled wine. New concepts of marketing in the Madeira wine business were introduced as well as innovative packaging like the wickered flagon. The quality of our wines gained an excellent reputation among consumers which helped to strenghten Barbeito’s image in the international market.

As time went by our company increased its activities and ended up involved in the bulk wine business in the beginning of the 70’s. This involvement brought many changes in Barbeito’s daily operations due to an excessive growth in production.

The competition among exporters in the bulk wine business was very high and small companies like ours had to strive to keep that area of business active and profitable.

However, during the 80’s we started realizing that Barbeito’s involvement in that kind of exports were damaging the quality of the bottled wine that was produced.

The difficult decision to stop exporting wine in bulk only came in 1991 with the entrance of Ricardo Vasconcelos Freitas to the company. In fact, 1991 was the year of the beginning of many changes in Vinhos Barbeito, being one of the most important the joint venture with the Kinoshita family, with whom we had already a close commercial and personal relationship since 1967. This decision enabled us to concentrate our efforts in just ageing, producing and blending the best quality wines. It was like going back to the past, when our grandfather just wanted to produce and sell good bottled wine, even if only in small quantities.


In 1991 another important change occurred in our company: for first time someone from our family became responsible for the making of the wine. In 1993, after two years learning the “secrets” of our wines’ style and character as well as studying modern techniques of wine making, Ricardo Freitas faced alone his first grape harvest.  Thinking of the future, we began building a working team in which all members work under the same motto: produce good quality wines with a unique style.

Since then Vinhos Barbeito never stopped investing in the purchase of good quality grapes to make fine wines. To achieve that goal, year after year, we work to establish closer relationships with farmers.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Madeira

The fantastic jungle of an island just off the coast of Portugal. It produces some still wines too but it is famous for the wine named after the island itself. It is a fortified wine made in a unique process.  It can be nutty and dry to biscuity and sweet. A range of noble white grapes, including Malvasia, are used to produce these diverse and delectable fortified wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.