Aberfeldy - 18YO Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky

$210.00
Sale price

Regular price $210.00

"Aberfeldy's 18 Year Old single malt Scotch whisky was originally launched for the Duty Free Market.

Presented in a bottle designed to fit in with the rest of the Aberfeldy redesign, this stylish single malt is a creamy, easy-going treat for the palate. Brimming with familiar notes of vanilla, buttermilk pancakes and stewed fruits, as well as warming oak notes from the fairly long maturation."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Aberfeldy Distillery is found on the shores of beautiful Loch Tay and was originally opened by John Dewar in 1896 and began producing Whisky in 1898.

It is situated in the Highlands region of Scotland.

Rough Start

In terms of Scottish distilleries, this makes it quite young, but it has come through many hardships to still be striving today.  It was opened during an intense moment in the Scotch industry, with the Pattison Crash occurring in December 1898.  This saw many distilleries going into bankruptcy, with only a few surviving. Luckily for Dewar’s, Aberfeldy was one of them.

The Legend of Tommy

It continued on under the leadership of John Dewar’s sons, John and Tommy. Tommy was a well-known character in high society at the time, and was the third person in Britain to own a car.

He was well respected in his company and did a lot for the brand, helping them to gain prominence on an international level, and he had friends in high places, including the Prince of Wales and Tommy Lipton, famous for his tea.

Tommy was a brilliant marketer and made sure people knew about his brand. When he was relegated to the back of a trade show in Birmingham, he hired a bagpiper in full regalia to serenade passers by, which certainly drew attention!

War Halts Production

Unfortunately, even Tommy’s business acumen was no match for international war. World War I meant that Whisky production at Aberfeldy, like with many distilleries, was forced to cease so the grain could be used for food.

This only last until 1919, when the distillery went back into production. It continued to grow over the next few years and was eventually sold to Distillers Company Ltd., which is now the drinks giant Diageo.

The Second World War brought the same fate as the First to Aberfeldy, but it flourished when its door reopened.

Happy Endings

Despite a somewhat rough start and a bit of turmoil in the middle, Aberfeldy has gone from strength to strength.

Today it is a very successful part of the Bacardi family of malts after they bought it back in 1998, and has most recently had a full range taken to market in 2014 and, alongside their revamped distillery experience, have won multiple awards.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Aberfeldy's 18 Year Old single malt Scotch whisky was originally launched for the Duty Free Market.

Presented in a bottle designed to fit in with the rest of the Aberfeldy redesign, this stylish single malt is a creamy, easy-going treat for the palate. Brimming with familiar notes of vanilla, buttermilk pancakes and stewed fruits, as well as warming oak notes from the fairly long maturation."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Aberfeldy Distillery is found on the shores of beautiful Loch Tay and was originally opened by John Dewar in 1896 and began producing Whisky in 1898.

It is situated in the Highlands region of Scotland.

Rough Start

In terms of Scottish distilleries, this makes it quite young, but it has come through many hardships to still be striving today.  It was opened during an intense moment in the Scotch industry, with the Pattison Crash occurring in December 1898.  This saw many distilleries going into bankruptcy, with only a few surviving. Luckily for Dewar’s, Aberfeldy was one of them.

The Legend of Tommy

It continued on under the leadership of John Dewar’s sons, John and Tommy. Tommy was a well-known character in high society at the time, and was the third person in Britain to own a car.

He was well respected in his company and did a lot for the brand, helping them to gain prominence on an international level, and he had friends in high places, including the Prince of Wales and Tommy Lipton, famous for his tea.

Tommy was a brilliant marketer and made sure people knew about his brand. When he was relegated to the back of a trade show in Birmingham, he hired a bagpiper in full regalia to serenade passers by, which certainly drew attention!

War Halts Production

Unfortunately, even Tommy’s business acumen was no match for international war. World War I meant that Whisky production at Aberfeldy, like with many distilleries, was forced to cease so the grain could be used for food.

This only last until 1919, when the distillery went back into production. It continued to grow over the next few years and was eventually sold to Distillers Company Ltd., which is now the drinks giant Diageo.

The Second World War brought the same fate as the First to Aberfeldy, but it flourished when its door reopened.

Happy Endings

Despite a somewhat rough start and a bit of turmoil in the middle, Aberfeldy has gone from strength to strength.

Today it is a very successful part of the Bacardi family of malts after they bought it back in 1998, and has most recently had a full range taken to market in 2014 and, alongside their revamped distillery experience, have won multiple awards.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.