Seifried - Grüner Veltliner 2019

$22.00
Sale price

Regular price $22.00

TASTING NOTE

The 2019 Seifried Nelson Grüner Veltliner has fresh apple and elderflower aromas on the nose. The Palate has the slightest hint of white pepper and autumn quince flavours coming through, leaving a smooth lingering finish.

"Beautifully ripe and elegantly expressed, the bouquet shows apricot, fig, lemon zest and white floral characters, leading to a wonderfully weighted palate that's delightfully textured and persistent. It's poised and attractively structured with a lengthy refreshing finish. At its best: now to 2023."

Suitable for Vegetarians and Vegans!

THE VINEYARD

The Edens Road vineyard is in an extremely stony area where water and nutrient levels are low. This helps us to restrict the plants vigour and to crop at low levels. To further enhance the aromatics, leaves were removed to allow light penetration and air movement around the fruiting zone. Our Edens Road vineyard is situated 15 km from the coast and is sheltered from the south by the Richmond Ranges. The ‘soil’ is a combination of rocks and boulders which is very hard on the farm equipment but vital for holding the warmth of Nelson’s sun - and ripening the Grüner Veltliner fruit.

WINEMAKERS NOTE

Grüner Veltliner, is the most widely planted white grape variety in Austria which is Hermann Seifried’s homeland. We were thrilled to finally be able to grow Grüner Veltliner here in New Zealand after it had passed through the long quarantine process. In 2008 we chose our Brightwater Vineyard to plant a small area of these very special vines. More recently, we have established Grüner Veltliner vines in our Edens Road vineyard.  

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Seifried Family Winemakers

We grew up eating the intensely flavoured and crisp apples for which New Zealand is world renowned.  For the past 10 years Mark has been experimenting in our backyard with small batch cidermaking, trialing and perfecting what has become Abel Méthode Cider. 

  

--------THE REGION--------

Nelson

Located in the north-west of South Island, this warm enclave is hemmed in by Mount Arthur and the Southern Alps. Chardonnay and Riesling have found its feet among the free-draining, stony silt soils while Gewürztraminer also shows potential.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

TASTING NOTE

The 2019 Seifried Nelson Grüner Veltliner has fresh apple and elderflower aromas on the nose. The Palate has the slightest hint of white pepper and autumn quince flavours coming through, leaving a smooth lingering finish.

"Beautifully ripe and elegantly expressed, the bouquet shows apricot, fig, lemon zest and white floral characters, leading to a wonderfully weighted palate that's delightfully textured and persistent. It's poised and attractively structured with a lengthy refreshing finish. At its best: now to 2023."

Suitable for Vegetarians and Vegans!

THE VINEYARD

The Edens Road vineyard is in an extremely stony area where water and nutrient levels are low. This helps us to restrict the plants vigour and to crop at low levels. To further enhance the aromatics, leaves were removed to allow light penetration and air movement around the fruiting zone. Our Edens Road vineyard is situated 15 km from the coast and is sheltered from the south by the Richmond Ranges. The ‘soil’ is a combination of rocks and boulders which is very hard on the farm equipment but vital for holding the warmth of Nelson’s sun - and ripening the Grüner Veltliner fruit.

WINEMAKERS NOTE

Grüner Veltliner, is the most widely planted white grape variety in Austria which is Hermann Seifried’s homeland. We were thrilled to finally be able to grow Grüner Veltliner here in New Zealand after it had passed through the long quarantine process. In 2008 we chose our Brightwater Vineyard to plant a small area of these very special vines. More recently, we have established Grüner Veltliner vines in our Edens Road vineyard.  

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Seifried Family Winemakers

We grew up eating the intensely flavoured and crisp apples for which New Zealand is world renowned.  For the past 10 years Mark has been experimenting in our backyard with small batch cidermaking, trialing and perfecting what has become Abel Méthode Cider. 

  

--------THE REGION--------

Nelson

Located in the north-west of South Island, this warm enclave is hemmed in by Mount Arthur and the Southern Alps. Chardonnay and Riesling have found its feet among the free-draining, stony silt soils while Gewürztraminer also shows potential.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.