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Pheasant's Tears - Shavkapito 2017

$48.00
Sale price

Regular price $48.00

"The wine itself has bold flavours with rich aromas of smoke, leather, tobacco and hints of anise precede a palate of plum, cherry and liquorice notes. It's a perfect partner to robust meaty dishes so goes well with grilled or roasted lamb, beef and game birds. This is solid, with a certain chocolate dustiness, some plum and blueberry and a mouthful of tannins, yet it comes in at a lovely low alcohol."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Pheasant's Tears

Pheasant’s Tears is a very new winery which was only set up in 2006. Yet, it has already come to be known as one of the golden players in the country and one of the leading ‘natural’ wine producers. John Wurdeman is the co-founder and winemaker of Pheasant’s Tears and came to Georgia through a CD of Georgian music. The focus of Pheasant’s Tears is on rare varietals and preserving the unique expressions of terroir to be found in Kakheti. All grapes are autocthonous to Georgia, such as Tavkvervi, Shakapito, Tsolikouri, Rkatsiteli, and they even make a ‘dream blend’ from 400 different varieties!

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Shavkapito

Shavkapito is a rarely seen red grape varietal from Georgia, one of many. Like a few of Georgia's grapes it was once danced around royal households but now is hardly found in Georgia. It produces wines with decent acidities for reds and has a light-medium body. Similar to Lagrein, Marzemino, Mencia or even Cabernet Franc.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Georgia

Georgia is the country where winemaking and viticulture comes from - until proven otherwise. It is where the oldest grape vines and winemaking equipment have been found - some of which that dates back to 6,000BC. It is home to many refreshing whites and red, as well as the home of many top orange wines.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"The wine itself has bold flavours with rich aromas of smoke, leather, tobacco and hints of anise precede a palate of plum, cherry and liquorice notes. It's a perfect partner to robust meaty dishes so goes well with grilled or roasted lamb, beef and game birds. This is solid, with a certain chocolate dustiness, some plum and blueberry and a mouthful of tannins, yet it comes in at a lovely low alcohol."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Pheasant's Tears

Pheasant’s Tears is a very new winery which was only set up in 2006. Yet, it has already come to be known as one of the golden players in the country and one of the leading ‘natural’ wine producers. John Wurdeman is the co-founder and winemaker of Pheasant’s Tears and came to Georgia through a CD of Georgian music. The focus of Pheasant’s Tears is on rare varietals and preserving the unique expressions of terroir to be found in Kakheti. All grapes are autocthonous to Georgia, such as Tavkvervi, Shakapito, Tsolikouri, Rkatsiteli, and they even make a ‘dream blend’ from 400 different varieties!

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Shavkapito

Shavkapito is a rarely seen red grape varietal from Georgia, one of many. Like a few of Georgia's grapes it was once danced around royal households but now is hardly found in Georgia. It produces wines with decent acidities for reds and has a light-medium body. Similar to Lagrein, Marzemino, Mencia or even Cabernet Franc.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Georgia

Georgia is the country where winemaking and viticulture comes from - until proven otherwise. It is where the oldest grape vines and winemaking equipment have been found - some of which that dates back to 6,000BC. It is home to many refreshing whites and red, as well as the home of many top orange wines.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.