Prieto Pariente Viñedos de la Provincia 2015

$40.00
Sale price

Regular price $40.00

"A blend of old-vine Tempranillo and Grenache with dollops of red fruits on the fore. It has bruised red cherries, baked red plums and hints of liquorice and leather, too. The palate is juicy, medium bodied with supple tannins.  From old vineyards in Valbuena de Duero (1945), Mucientes (1941) and Pedrosa del Rey (1955). We have assembled the diversity of the region of Valladolid into a wine that shows delicacy and fruity freshness. "


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Prieto Pariente

Prieto Pariente is a new wine project initiated and led by the enthusiasm and commitment of Martina and Ignacio Prieto Pariente, third generation of winemakers, and supported by the complicity and experience of the second generation.

The core of this new journey is something as old as the practice of winemaking in our land, that is, the expression of the origin through the search and selection of the oldest vineyards in our region.

We strongly believe in a sustainable viticulture, and in respecting the roots.

Difference, territory and selection define the project of Prieto Pariente.
We identify ourselves with names like Castille and Leon, Valladolid, the paramos of the North Plat-eau of Spain, and the mineral hillsides of Cebreros and Bierzo that enclose our region.

Our aim with Prieto Pariente is to create wines with unique personalities, that provide a distinctive character and with a profile of freshness and complexity.

Our labeled line Páramos de Valladolid consist of two multi varietal red wines; El Origen de Prieto Pariente and Prieto Pariente. The grapes of these two wines come from vineyards in different wine-making areas of the province. We have strategically selected the vineyards, and blended them in or-der to obtain unique and elegant wines.

Additionally, we have found a small hidden vineyard of Viognier in the Paramos of Valladolid, and of these vines aimed to make an aromatic wine with volume and body.

We invite you to join us in this new adventure.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Tempranillo and Grenache

Tempranillo is one of the most important grape varietals in all of Spain where you might also know it as Tinto Fino - like it is in Portugal. Most notably it is the leading grape of Rioja's red blend where it was traditionally quite an oaky and spicy red wine. In Ribera del Duero, it arguably, comes into its own as it doesn't see as much oak so that you can truly get to see its lively red fruit flavours.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Castilla y Leon

Castilla y Léon, in the northern half of the central Iberian Plateau, is the largest of Spain's 17 administrative regions, covering about one-fifth of the country's total surface area. It stretches roughly 350 km from the centre of Spain almost all the way to the north coast. Equally wide, it connects the Rioja wine region with the border of Portugal.

Red wines rule in Castilla y Léon, and the Tempranillo grape variety is unquestionably the king. It is known here by various synonyms including Tinta del Pais, Tinto de Toro and Tinto Fino. It is the grape behind all of the region's finest wines except Bierzo, which makes good use of Mencia. The supporting cast includes the French varieties Grenache, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah.

Castilla y Léon's white wines are far fewer in number than the reds, but only marginally less prestigious. They are made mostly from the white grapes Verdejo and Viura.

Although the region's economy has traditionally focused on cereal crops, viticulture has been a significant economic activity in Castilla y Léon for more than 2000 years. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the acreage devoted to vineyards fell significantly, and the focus was shifted from quantity to quality. Today, Castilla y Léon is home to some of Spain's most respected DOs. Most notable are Ribera del Duero, Toro, Rueda and Bierzo.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"A blend of old-vine Tempranillo and Grenache with dollops of red fruits on the fore. It has bruised red cherries, baked red plums and hints of liquorice and leather, too. The palate is juicy, medium bodied with supple tannins.  From old vineyards in Valbuena de Duero (1945), Mucientes (1941) and Pedrosa del Rey (1955). We have assembled the diversity of the region of Valladolid into a wine that shows delicacy and fruity freshness. "


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Prieto Pariente

Prieto Pariente is a new wine project initiated and led by the enthusiasm and commitment of Martina and Ignacio Prieto Pariente, third generation of winemakers, and supported by the complicity and experience of the second generation.

The core of this new journey is something as old as the practice of winemaking in our land, that is, the expression of the origin through the search and selection of the oldest vineyards in our region.

We strongly believe in a sustainable viticulture, and in respecting the roots.

Difference, territory and selection define the project of Prieto Pariente.
We identify ourselves with names like Castille and Leon, Valladolid, the paramos of the North Plat-eau of Spain, and the mineral hillsides of Cebreros and Bierzo that enclose our region.

Our aim with Prieto Pariente is to create wines with unique personalities, that provide a distinctive character and with a profile of freshness and complexity.

Our labeled line Páramos de Valladolid consist of two multi varietal red wines; El Origen de Prieto Pariente and Prieto Pariente. The grapes of these two wines come from vineyards in different wine-making areas of the province. We have strategically selected the vineyards, and blended them in or-der to obtain unique and elegant wines.

Additionally, we have found a small hidden vineyard of Viognier in the Paramos of Valladolid, and of these vines aimed to make an aromatic wine with volume and body.

We invite you to join us in this new adventure.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Tempranillo and Grenache

Tempranillo is one of the most important grape varietals in all of Spain where you might also know it as Tinto Fino - like it is in Portugal. Most notably it is the leading grape of Rioja's red blend where it was traditionally quite an oaky and spicy red wine. In Ribera del Duero, it arguably, comes into its own as it doesn't see as much oak so that you can truly get to see its lively red fruit flavours.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Castilla y Leon

Castilla y Léon, in the northern half of the central Iberian Plateau, is the largest of Spain's 17 administrative regions, covering about one-fifth of the country's total surface area. It stretches roughly 350 km from the centre of Spain almost all the way to the north coast. Equally wide, it connects the Rioja wine region with the border of Portugal.

Red wines rule in Castilla y Léon, and the Tempranillo grape variety is unquestionably the king. It is known here by various synonyms including Tinta del Pais, Tinto de Toro and Tinto Fino. It is the grape behind all of the region's finest wines except Bierzo, which makes good use of Mencia. The supporting cast includes the French varieties Grenache, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah.

Castilla y Léon's white wines are far fewer in number than the reds, but only marginally less prestigious. They are made mostly from the white grapes Verdejo and Viura.

Although the region's economy has traditionally focused on cereal crops, viticulture has been a significant economic activity in Castilla y Léon for more than 2000 years. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the acreage devoted to vineyards fell significantly, and the focus was shifted from quantity to quality. Today, Castilla y Léon is home to some of Spain's most respected DOs. Most notable are Ribera del Duero, Toro, Rueda and Bierzo.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.