Lunatic & Lover Botanical NZ Rum 700ml

$125.00
Sale price

Regular price $125.00

Creating rum is, in theory, relatively simple. Sugar cane based product is fermented with yeast to produce alcohol, which is put through a still. Creating good rum however, is an altogether more challenging proposition. The devil, as they say, is most definitely in the detail. We take aberrant care to passionately craft a distillate that is rich and interesting, even before it is enhanced by our botanicals.

Our pursuit of perfect flavour begins with molasses; a thick, dark, delightfully messy product of the sugar refining process. Conveniently, we don’t have to go far to source ours, the historic sugar works at Chelsea on Auckland’s North Shore is a short trip from the distillery and it is here we choose their finest, food grade molasses. The warm, earthy, soft liquorice flavour is a far cry better than the bitter alternative used for cattle fodder, albeit a far cry more expensive. This provides us with the ideal base from which to conjure our spirit.

Fermentation is not just simply the creation of alcohol from sugar by yeast. The microscopic, single-cell beasties are also responsible for much of the flavour that materialises in the final spirit and as such, need to be treated with love, care, and attention to coax out those precious compounds. We spent years collaborating and experimenting before choosing the specific strain that satisfied, and produced the delectable profile we coveted.

“Our pursuit of perfect flavour begins with molasses”

After our prolonged process of fermentation, once the yeast has worked its wondrous magic, we shift the now alcoholic wash over to our hand beaten, copper-pot still for the next stage of the liquid’s transformation. In order to retain much of the flavour created thus far, we choose to distill the rum in a single, very slow pass. This requires a patient and skilled hand to eke out only the sweetest ethanol and most desirable flavours. The result is an intriguing distillate of great substance and depth.

The sane would stop there, content on having made an exemplary rum in traditional style. Alas, not us. For reasons best known only unto ourselves, we’ve decided to introduce an entirely new lexicon of aroma and tastes into our beloved spirit, through an entirely mad method.

The lucidity behind the lunacy is as follows; A second distillation whereby meticulously selected herbs, spices and roots marry into the liquid, through a complex technique of vapour infusion. Like a spectacle of spectre, the souls from the ingredients rise from their earthly bodies in a heavenly mist of vaporised flavour and aromatics. The delectable purities are then infused through our spirit - thus creating an almost completely new category; Botanical Rum.

THE BOTANICALS

DANDELION ROOT
– New Zealand –

Woody and earthy with lovely roasted tones. Works in delicious harmony with the base spirit.

HOROPITO
– New Zealand –

Herbal aroma with a sharp, peppery heat in the mouth

MAIREHAU
– New Zealand –

Distinctive, beautiful, bright top note. Sweetish lemon citrus with a hint of vanilla and cinnamon.

ORANGE PEEL
– New Zealand –

Warm citrus on nose and palate. Brings brightness and acidity particularly noticeable on initial nosing and front of palate.

BURDOCK ROOT
– New Zealand –

A traditional companion to Dandelion root, it brings a hint of sweetness to the earthiness.

NUTMEG
– India –

Mellow, warm spice, sweet and woody with some fixative qualities

BAY LEAF
– New Zealand –

Herbaceous, slightly piney notes. Works in the background of flavour profile.

CACAO NIB
– Peru –

Chocolatey aroma and deep, dark, slightly bitter finish to palate. Adds depth and richness.

ORRIS ROOT
– Italy –

Very light floral and musty notes but chiefly acts an aroma fixative.

COFFEE
– Central America –

Nutty and roasted qualities. Slight bitterness to counter the sweetness of the alcohol and add structure that comes through in the finish.

PIMENTO
– Jamaica –

Spicy and piquant adding spice to the palette, with delightfully tangy and pungent aromatics.

GREEN CARDAMOM
– India –

Intensely aromatic, green, resinous. Used sparingly as it can easily overpower.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Creating rum is, in theory, relatively simple. Sugar cane based product is fermented with yeast to produce alcohol, which is put through a still. Creating good rum however, is an altogether more challenging proposition. The devil, as they say, is most definitely in the detail. We take aberrant care to passionately craft a distillate that is rich and interesting, even before it is enhanced by our botanicals.

Our pursuit of perfect flavour begins with molasses; a thick, dark, delightfully messy product of the sugar refining process. Conveniently, we don’t have to go far to source ours, the historic sugar works at Chelsea on Auckland’s North Shore is a short trip from the distillery and it is here we choose their finest, food grade molasses. The warm, earthy, soft liquorice flavour is a far cry better than the bitter alternative used for cattle fodder, albeit a far cry more expensive. This provides us with the ideal base from which to conjure our spirit.

Fermentation is not just simply the creation of alcohol from sugar by yeast. The microscopic, single-cell beasties are also responsible for much of the flavour that materialises in the final spirit and as such, need to be treated with love, care, and attention to coax out those precious compounds. We spent years collaborating and experimenting before choosing the specific strain that satisfied, and produced the delectable profile we coveted.

“Our pursuit of perfect flavour begins with molasses”

After our prolonged process of fermentation, once the yeast has worked its wondrous magic, we shift the now alcoholic wash over to our hand beaten, copper-pot still for the next stage of the liquid’s transformation. In order to retain much of the flavour created thus far, we choose to distill the rum in a single, very slow pass. This requires a patient and skilled hand to eke out only the sweetest ethanol and most desirable flavours. The result is an intriguing distillate of great substance and depth.

The sane would stop there, content on having made an exemplary rum in traditional style. Alas, not us. For reasons best known only unto ourselves, we’ve decided to introduce an entirely new lexicon of aroma and tastes into our beloved spirit, through an entirely mad method.

The lucidity behind the lunacy is as follows; A second distillation whereby meticulously selected herbs, spices and roots marry into the liquid, through a complex technique of vapour infusion. Like a spectacle of spectre, the souls from the ingredients rise from their earthly bodies in a heavenly mist of vaporised flavour and aromatics. The delectable purities are then infused through our spirit - thus creating an almost completely new category; Botanical Rum.

THE BOTANICALS

DANDELION ROOT
– New Zealand –

Woody and earthy with lovely roasted tones. Works in delicious harmony with the base spirit.

HOROPITO
– New Zealand –

Herbal aroma with a sharp, peppery heat in the mouth

MAIREHAU
– New Zealand –

Distinctive, beautiful, bright top note. Sweetish lemon citrus with a hint of vanilla and cinnamon.

ORANGE PEEL
– New Zealand –

Warm citrus on nose and palate. Brings brightness and acidity particularly noticeable on initial nosing and front of palate.

BURDOCK ROOT
– New Zealand –

A traditional companion to Dandelion root, it brings a hint of sweetness to the earthiness.

NUTMEG
– India –

Mellow, warm spice, sweet and woody with some fixative qualities

BAY LEAF
– New Zealand –

Herbaceous, slightly piney notes. Works in the background of flavour profile.

CACAO NIB
– Peru –

Chocolatey aroma and deep, dark, slightly bitter finish to palate. Adds depth and richness.

ORRIS ROOT
– Italy –

Very light floral and musty notes but chiefly acts an aroma fixative.

COFFEE
– Central America –

Nutty and roasted qualities. Slight bitterness to counter the sweetness of the alcohol and add structure that comes through in the finish.

PIMENTO
– Jamaica –

Spicy and piquant adding spice to the palette, with delightfully tangy and pungent aromatics.

GREEN CARDAMOM
– India –

Intensely aromatic, green, resinous. Used sparingly as it can easily overpower.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.